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Post processing for Arch Viz
show user profile  rob@dynamic
Hi Guys,

I was just wondering in general what methods to you use in post for your Arch Viz images (Specifically exteriors)?

Are there set processes that you go through?

What tools do you use?

What do you do in post vs max

Any insight you guys could offer would be great.

Thanks


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read 984 times
10/13/2011 10:43:28 AM (last edit: 10/13/2011 10:43:28 AM)
show user profile  HateTank
Photoshop - and maybe Magic Bullet Looks Builder, or other color grading app (yes you can do a lot of it in PS as well, with a little patience, but the template thingy is fast and effective, and provides a quick overview of multiple grading styles).

Render in passes (and to .exr to get extra exposure options on PS-import) - AO, MultiMatte (for isolating objects), reflection, Alpha, Z-depth (for slight distance desat/fogging), maybe on occasion a shadow pass as well.
- and mix it all up good in photoshop ;)

One thing I am particular fond of, is the MultiMatte which allows you pretty much any tweakage in post, on object ID level... change colour, add more reflection, add grime or whatever you want...

Photos and Looks builder:

- and without (sorry for FB aliasing)

Another:

- and the original:

- again, you can do most of the grading in PS.
Wish I could show you the difference between one of my straight renders and the after-post-result. I'd say there's about 30-40% work in post...

Cheers


Nick Jensen
Polygon wrestler - Rockstar

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read 973 times
10/13/2011 11:11:24 AM (last edit: 10/13/2011 11:20:21 AM)
show user profile  GirishDJoshi
According to my experience and what I have learned very feeeeeeeeew archviz client would like post work on their images. Others need them REAL clean. No one wants vignetting, old look on their renderings.

If you are amazed by the renders on say evermotion those are all personal works done in 3-4 months time. Most of them have posted tutorials or setups you just need to go and have a look.

For pure archviz is bascially PS for colors, white balancing and MAJORLY for 2d trees :P

Otherwise Afx with Magic bullet.


Hope its helps.


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read 963 times
10/13/2011 11:24:38 AM (last edit: 10/13/2011 11:24:38 AM)
show user profile  HateTank
I should proably mention, that most of my work is interiors - it's been a while since I've had anything from an actual architect presented to me at work. But in the "better days" we've had some odd requests on occasion - style wise...

That being said, you're not likely getting a "strong" image straight outta render, and tweaking colors and shadows etc. - even in simple archviz, takes too long in 3D, compared to how fast you can edit stuff in post with masks and passes...
- i'ts probably a question of temper and preferences though ;)

*edit* the above images we're not meant as examples of work I've had to do for an architect - just an example of how much you can "move" an image in one, or a completely other direction in post...

Cheers

Nick Jensen
Polygon wrestler - Rockstar

Fusskalt


read 954 times
10/13/2011 11:36:48 AM (last edit: 10/13/2011 11:38:08 AM)
show user profile  Jock
"According to my experience and what I have learned very feeeeeeeeew archviz client would like post work on their images."

I'm suprised as my experience is quite the opposite. Thats from working with a mixture of architects, interior designers and house builders.
read 943 times
10/13/2011 12:06:39 PM (last edit: 10/13/2011 12:06:39 PM)
show user profile  STRAT
i agree with Girish.

the large majority, if not all of my clients, and clients as a whole in the UK generally want nice clean realism in their imagery where arch vis is concerned.





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read 931 times
10/13/2011 12:32:39 PM (last edit: 10/13/2011 12:32:39 PM)
show user profile  3joez
Where I work, in a photographic studio, we consider the render to be 80%, more or less, of the process. The rest is PS. We do AO almost always, some bloom, little corrections and color balancing.
Vignetting and color aberration are avoided, especially the second one.
It's fun how in real photography you tend to get rid of those artifacts while in 3d renderings you struggle to put them back.
You must use your good sense. If you want, I think you can add those artifacts, but they must so subtle
you almost don't notice. At that point though, better to focus on a good light, good models and good framing.
read 915 times
10/13/2011 4:15:58 PM (last edit: 10/13/2011 4:15:58 PM)
show user profile  Jock
"the large majority, if not all of my clients, and clients as a whole in the UK generally want nice clean realism in their imagery where arch vis is concerned. "

But surely to get that you need to do post work on it, which is the opposite of whats being mentioned.

Most renders straight from max have a CG feel to them, then its photoshop that brings them to life. Dont think i've ever used a render straight from Max.
read 902 times
10/13/2011 4:48:36 PM (last edit: 10/13/2011 4:48:36 PM)
show user profile  STRAT
but post work need not be special effects, vignetting, funny filters, mad colour/contrast adjusts etc etc. thats what i mean when post isn't an enhancement.
those original car photos up there - much more in keeping and client friendly than the adjusted more 'arty' ones, where archi is concerned.
yup, post work is a must. everyone needs post. we all use it. the renderer alone isnt enough (it is, but why struggle?). in archiviz its used to subtly enhance realism.






SJLEWORTHY.COM











read 895 times
10/13/2011 5:19:20 PM (last edit: 10/13/2011 5:20:45 PM)
show user profile  HateTank
Once again - the car shots were just there for the sake of showing how much an image (3D or photo) can be pushed in another direction. I admit they don't represent the typical 3D viz job, but on a rare occasion they do. I am not allowed to post company works on forums, and only get occasional approval to post (finished) works on my own website, but I have both interiors and a few exteriors on polygonpoop.dk, so if you wan't to see examples of my typical post work in both scenarios go have a look.
The most basic post work that applies to both interior and exterior, is color, hue/sat, and contrast adjustments. It usually doesn't take much more than that to keep architects happy.

- no two clients are the same, and their needs and wishes usually reflect that. We've had great success with trying to push more untraditional works to those clients who we feel are less traditional. It's about gut feeling...
I personally love, when we get those jobs that calls for a little out of the ordinary :)

Cheers

Nick Jensen
Polygon wrestler - Rockstar

Fusskalt


read 880 times
10/14/2011 7:06:06 AM (last edit: 10/14/2011 7:06:06 AM)
show user profile  GirishDJoshi
By post I meant super-extra.

Most renders straight from max have a CG feel to them, then its photoshop that brings them to life. Dont think i've ever used a render straight from Max.

Very true. A little work has to go on them.

You have to do basic post work such as white balacing, exposure, brightness. Personally I won't count that as post :P


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read 876 times
10/14/2011 7:50:47 AM (last edit: 10/14/2011 7:50:47 AM)
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