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Portfolio- Architecture
show user profile  SomniumX
Hi there guys!

At first; Sorry for my bad english.

I'm following this forum for 1.5 year now, just made an account though!
Saw some great works over here, and followed some tutorials of M. Grote.
Want to start making a own portfolio in architecture. I have some experience with moddeling, however when I design in 3D I just start and model on feeling which means;
My own scale / properties of items, own design, and using only 3ds max and photoshop for the designs.

My questions:
- Do i need to use Autocad for my designs if i'm using it for my portfolio? /does it turn out
in better results?
- Is it better to use in unit setup metric and model everything on exact size.
- Do i need vray and such, or is realistic rendering also able with mental ray?

Probely there will come alot of more questions, so will keep this threat open for questions.

Thanks already! :)


read 761 times
12/1/2013 9:43:13 AM (last edit: 12/1/2013 9:43:13 AM)
show user profile  alexnomore
You don't really need anything, it is up to you what programs you find convenient and useful.
Personally I use autocad, 3ds max-Vray and photoshop. You can do pretty much whatever you want if you learn to use those.

When it comes to scale, you should always work 1:1 for various reasons. One is that it is better to handle your scene and settings when in 1:1 in 3ds. Second thing is that in autocad you can always set the scale you want afterwards. Learn to use layouts! Don't forget to raster your drawings from Autocad into Photoshop.

Considering Vray and mental ray: Generally any bounce-renderer produces the same results more or less. Again it is up to you which one to use. Vray is great for still images but it gives me a hard time when I do animations. Too much flickering to fight with.

Don't hesitate to post some work of yours!
This forum has helped me a lot to improve myself.

Welcome and good luck!
read 753 times
12/1/2013 10:37:00 AM (last edit: 12/1/2013 10:37:00 AM)
show user profile  mike_renouf
If you're serious about architectural visualisation then you will need to learn at least the basics of AutoCAD, or something similar. Even if you don't do any technical drafting with it, you will need to clean up drawings in preparation for importing them to max.

Mentalray is capable as a rendering engine for archviz and you can get photorealistic results with it. Vray has the advantage of being easier to set up and quicker to render in my opinion, though I've not used mentalray since max 2012, so it may have improved. I can't comment on the animation issue, as I've not done much of that, though there are many forum members here who use vray for animation without problems.

Photoshop will give you a huge amount of post processing capability, and I believe max still comes with its own compositing software




read 734 times
12/1/2013 1:10:37 PM (last edit: 12/1/2013 1:10:37 PM)
show user profile  STRAT
Just get going and enjoy. Create your own standards and methods that suit you.
If you want to be serious and employable then yes, autocad is a great idea. As is a render engine such as vray or mental ray.

Personally, i purely use C4D for all modelling and rendering these days (1:1 at 1 unit = 1cm).

Go have fun and get posting!





SJLEWORTHY.COM











read 680 times
12/2/2013 11:02:25 AM (last edit: 12/2/2013 11:02:25 AM)
show user profile  donvella
thread hijack: STRAT, do you use AE for compositing? I have been dying to hear someone in archviz using CC's scene import feature.




read 640 times
12/5/2013 2:07:28 AM (last edit: 12/5/2013 2:07:28 AM)
show user profile  herfst1
Thread hijack #2: Is CAD hard to learn if you already know Max? Are there shared skills?
read 618 times
12/5/2013 6:19:38 AM (last edit: 12/5/2013 6:19:38 AM)
show user profile  donvella
Im sure STRAT could answer this better then me, however in the 3 archviz studios I have worked at the only CAD knowledge required and handy to know (which I dont) is exporting from CAD to max without blocks and crap you dont need. Also being able to position the model at 0, since the coordinates are different.

At the first studio I worked at we had a programmer write some import code to do that for us, since then I just merge it in and 0 it myself, and extrude from there.




read 614 times
12/5/2013 6:37:37 AM (last edit: 12/5/2013 6:37:37 AM)
show user profile  STRAT
james = AE? not often. rarely infact. i only use it once in a while when animating. Photoshop is my main comper.

h = learning CAD isnt hard, just monotonous. i learned CAD (autocad) before learning Max. these days i dont touch CAD. havent in several years. All CAD gives you over Max, where visuals are concerned, is a hypa accurate drawing. millermeter perfect.
But why is that needed? it isnt really.

CAD is an employable skill to have, and is essential for producing working drawings and architectural content. CAD will not model any better for you in 3D for archiviz. infact, if you want to learn CAD purely for this purpose I'd reckon you're on a hiding to nothing. it's harder, fiddly and not fast enough and optimized when pitted against the likes of Max and C4D of 3D modeling.

it does act as a good bases to clean up meshes and make sure positioning and scaling are correct before going into Max as mentioned above, but then, why not use SketchUp? a great simple 3D app which ticks every archiviz guy's box's.
SketchUp deals with splines, model cleanup and a whole host of other things more efficiently as per standard than all CAD and 3d programs put together, and it's compatibility and transferability are awesome.





SJLEWORTHY.COM











read 601 times
12/5/2013 9:27:56 AM (last edit: 12/5/2013 9:30:33 AM)
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