Forum Groups
  All forums
    Help & Feedback
      Questions
      Work in progress
      Finished Art
      Non-Max related
    Community
      Offtopic
      News
    Hardware
    Photography



Maxunderground news unavailable

Polymodeling Tables for 3D Artists
show user profile  TurboRudi
Searched google for some tips on polymodeling and came across these. I think they're great guidelines on how to keep a mesh clean. Particularly, these design tables deal with vertex numbering and the outcome of model appearance, when processed. . They show different kinds of subdividing and how to keep your models triangle free. Save them to your computer and learn these by heart they're really useful.

read 460 times
12/19/2011 9:42:44 PM (last edit: 12/19/2011 9:42:44 PM)
show user profile  Bolteon
these are very good. nice find; *adds to mf favorites*

-Marko Mandaric



read 435 times
12/20/2011 12:28:24 AM (last edit: 12/20/2011 12:28:24 AM)
show user profile  Mr_Stabby
there is really only one thing you need to know - any even amount of edges or verts can be closed with quads, any odd amount of edges or verts will create a trinagle.

read 414 times
12/20/2011 1:41:07 AM (last edit: 12/20/2011 1:41:07 AM)
show user profile  Dave
Also, triangles aren't a bad thing. You can use them on flat surfaces for subdivided meshes. (and of course for low poly assets, they're a requirement, not an option!)

"I flew over Egypt once"

read 372 times
12/20/2011 5:56:17 PM (last edit: 12/20/2011 5:56:17 PM)
show user profile  TurboRudi
This is meant for meshsmoothing I think
read 363 times
12/20/2011 6:24:42 PM (last edit: 12/20/2011 6:24:42 PM)
show user profile  Dave
Yus, meshsmoothing = subdividing.

"I flew over Egypt once"

read 361 times
12/20/2011 6:26:35 PM (last edit: 12/20/2011 6:26:35 PM)
show user profile  TurboRudi
well triangles ALWAYS mess up my meshsmoothing. Even quads sometimes when three or five vertices's are welded at one point. Is there a way to make triangles work for you when meshsmoothing?
read 342 times
12/20/2011 8:49:42 PM (last edit: 12/20/2011 8:49:42 PM)
show user profile  Nik Clark
If they aren't sharp angled, and are in the middle of a big flat area, they don't seem to cause too many shading issues. I tend to just avoid them in places where I know it will make things harder.



read 333 times
12/20/2011 9:53:10 PM (last edit: 12/20/2011 9:53:10 PM)
#Maxforums IRC
Open chat window


Support Maxforums.org