Forum Groups
  All forums
    Help & Feedback
      Questions
      Work in progress
      Finished Art
      Non-Max related
    Community
      Offtopic
      News
    Hardware
    Photography



Maxunderground news unavailable

 
First page  Go to the previous page   [01]  [02]  Go to the next page  Last page
 
Will overclocking a rendering computer cause problems
show user profile  Toadsage
I've heard overclocking will shorten the life of your computer, but by the time that happens, the processor will be outdated, and probably in the trashcan. However, what about keeping it at full load a good percentage of the time rendering?? Would I be better off just slightly overclocking it?? or is it best to just leave it alone?

In case your wondering, my pc is air cooled with the noctura NH-U12P with 2x NF-p12 premium fans. Good at 3ds max
Project Anime Recruit
read 517 times
8/5/2009 8:24:44 AM (last edit: 8/5/2009 8:24:44 AM)
show user profile  Jock
I dont know a great deal about computers so probably no point going into details but mine is overclocked and i've never had any bother with it, as to the difference i've no idea, the guys who helped me build it just thought it was a good idea at the time.
read 512 times
8/5/2009 8:35:35 AM (last edit: 8/5/2009 8:35:35 AM)
show user profile  Stephen R.
overclocking isnt going to have a significant effect on the life of the processor. The only downside to overclocking is the enhanced need for proper cooling, and the trickyness of balancing voltage, clock speed, multiplier, and ram overclocking (it has to be overclocked to match the speed of the processor), so that the whole machine runs stable.

As long as you get it stable and use the right tools to test the stability, you should be just fine in overclocking it.





read 485 times
8/5/2009 11:44:33 AM (last edit: 8/5/2009 11:44:33 AM)
show user profile  Toadsage
Excellent then, that's good to know. Every now and then I hear some guy bragging that people who overclock computers are idiots, so I figured I should double check the whole thing.

Ahh one more thing. I ran a prime 95 torture test on my computer, and the CPU temp stays steady at 60C However, core 1 2 3 and 4 run around 75C How does this all work? Good at 3ds max
Project Anime Recruit
read 473 times
8/5/2009 12:22:46 PM (last edit: 8/5/2009 12:26:25 PM)
show user profile  Stephen R.
there are five different temperature sensors on the processor, one is attached to the IHS (the aluminum block over the actual die), and then one inside each physical core. The fact that your cores are so much higher than the actual CPU temp (this is the one attached to the IHS), just means that there is poor transference of heat between the actual dies and the IHS. Other than getting a bowed water block or doing something extreme like sanding off the IHS and hard-mounting your cooling solution directly to the die, there really isnt a way around this.





read 458 times
8/5/2009 1:03:00 PM (last edit: 8/5/2009 1:03:00 PM)
show user profile  Toadsage
nice nice, so its normal for an air cooling system then. I seem to be having trouble getting all the settings right.. I tried to bring it up .4mhz, and the core temp gets up to 78, and the 4 cores go about 90-93 in a 10 minute period. Its the 920, but I tried bringing it up to 3.7 mhz and the temps went to about 85 on the cpu, and I stopped it when one of the core temps hit 97 in probably 5 minutes. It would idle around 34C and 50C on the cores. The EVGA x58 SLI LE motherboard seems to have different settings then most of the guides out there.


So the first question, Do I want to try and get my ram target ram frequency as close as possible to the rams max 1333mhz, or does this matter.

Also, I have a 650 watt power supply, and its fan is blowing relatively hot air into the heatsink, is this a problem. It also didn't have the original 8 pronged connector that attaches to the motherboard. So I ended up just getting a converter for it. Could this cause some problems. Good at 3ds max
Project Anime Recruit
read 449 times
8/5/2009 2:12:38 PM (last edit: 8/5/2009 2:12:38 PM)
show user profile  spoon
I used to overclock every pc i owned, just for the sport. I stopped doing it because well, its not worth the effort in my opinion ( of course i don't have to render long animations )

Do make sure that you know everything you NEED to know before you start overclocking. First spend a some weeks reading up about your chipset, specific motherboard, different methods of overclocking, ...

Example : if you're overclocking you fsb, are you sure your PCI bus isn't going to be overclocked also as a result? This can damage ide controllers, your soundcard, ... ( this might be a thing of the past though )

My point is : read up on overclocking before you start, there are many forums on this topic, it can save you money on thrashed hardware. Don't just start increasing your fsb "because your friend told you so"


read 445 times
8/5/2009 2:26:57 PM (last edit: 8/5/2009 2:26:57 PM)
show user profile  Dr. Jim
I would be interested in knowing if 'normal' overclocking really is worth it?
Are you gonna shave 15sec a frame in rendertime on a frame that takes 25minutes anyway?
Does it matter?

I understand there are of course crazy, insane hardware configurations that can really, really increase performance at great $$$ and effort,..........but aside from those, does 'basic' overclocking really give much of a performance increase?

Bryan C, Spoon........any thoughts?

read 436 times
8/5/2009 2:45:07 PM (last edit: 8/5/2009 2:45:07 PM)
show user profile  advance-software
The best way of increasing performance is to upgrade key components on a regular basis - CPU / motherboard / memory / GPU.

Overclocking is a shortcut ... if you don't screw up.

If you are going to do this, the following might be worth a read - regarding a new type of thermal paste ...

http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/09/08/05/1827246/DIY-CPU-Thermal-Grease-Using-Diamond-Dust?art_pos=3&art_pos=3


read 434 times
8/5/2009 2:49:54 PM (last edit: 8/5/2009 2:54:18 PM)
show user profile  Toadsage
Haha, you have a point spoon, perhaps I should read up on all of this first. That way I can get it right the first time without it costing extra money.

As for the speed increase. I actually tested this
On stock settings Takes 46-49 seconds
at the 3.2 mhz, takes 41 seconds
at the 3.6 mhz takes 36 seconds

Personally, I find this a very significant speed boost, if I can get everything the right temp.

LOL, diamond dust, interesting. I loved the first comment on that page xD I can't say I have any diamonds laying around, but I'll look into it more to make sure it will help some. Good at 3ds max
Project Anime Recruit
read 419 times
8/5/2009 3:40:10 PM (last edit: 8/5/2009 3:40:10 PM)
show user profile  Jollabollathan
"nice nice, so its normal for an air cooling system then. I seem to be having trouble getting all the settings right.. I tried to bring it up .4mhz, and the core temp gets up to 78, and the 4 cores go about 90-93 in a 10 minute period. Its the 920, but I tried bringing it up to 3.7 mhz and the temps went to about 85 on the cpu, and I stopped it when one of the core temps hit 97 in probably 5 minutes."

Are you serious? Mine shuts down the very second it goes over 80! Also, while I haven't OCed mine yet, those sound like incredibly high temperatures for that clock with that cooler. From what I've heard, you should be able to get it to 4GHz with no problems with the Noctua.

read 412 times
8/5/2009 4:10:58 PM (last edit: 8/5/2009 4:10:58 PM)
show user profile  Toadsage
har har har, Posted some pics of it, and somehow I have both fans blowing in towards the heatsink, instead of one blowing in, one blowing out.. THAT MIGHT HELP! I'll let you guys know how it turns out xD Good at 3ds max
Project Anime Recruit
read 392 times
8/5/2009 9:38:16 PM (last edit: 8/5/2009 9:38:16 PM)
show user profile  Toen
I haven't done rendering that has taken 24 hours non-stop but I have overclocked an i7 920 (2.66Ghz) processor to 3.4 air cooled and I have not had any problems at all with daily workings. I did a rendering that took 3 hours once and it was fine as well.

Dr. Jim,
From my experience it has helped. I forget what post it was in but when people were talking about rendering and test scene I got this kind of change out of it:

@ 2.66GHz (went turbo mode to 2.8GHz automatically) - 7:57 render time
@ 3.40 (overclocked, turbo mode off) - 6:39 render time

We should make a cpu rendering testing comparsion check-and-see thread.
read 378 times
8/6/2009 12:56:06 AM (last edit: 8/6/2009 1:26:00 AM)
show user profile  Toadsage
I am still confused why the temps are so high, switching the fans around didn't help at all, I tried reseating the heat sink with artic silver 5, switching the flow in the case, nothing seems to help. Supposedly I should get lower temps then this with the stock i7 heatsink??!!



Not a bad idea toen. Once I get my computer running right, I'll wouldn't mind submitting them on there.

But as far as the actually tests go, we would need two max files to be uploaded. One that tests the rendering on low quality, few shadows..ect, and one that tests a high quality render that needs calculations and caustics.



Good at 3ds max
Project Anime Recruit
read 348 times
8/6/2009 5:48:56 PM (last edit: 8/6/2009 5:48:56 PM)
show user profile  spoon
Did you raise the core voltage to get it stable? Maybe lower it a notch again and see if it can still handle 3 hour renders? Raising voltage helps stability but also raises temperature of course (raising it too much is the best way to destroy your cpu)

Also for overclocking, once in a while, cpu's are released that are simply ideal to overclock. This happens mostly just before another cpu type is introduced. The current cpu type is then optimised to the max, and in alot of cases you can then buy the lowest clocked version to that cpu and overclocked it to the frequency of the highest clocked versions:
- the P2 celerons 10 years back, they had models clocked at 300Mhz but each and every one of those could run at 450Mhz with air cooling and standard voltages (thats +150%)
- same for P3 650's which could all run at 866Mhz (i had an overclocked dual configuration with these)

So its actually best to investigate what models are best suited for oc'ing before you buy.


read 328 times
8/7/2009 1:51:24 AM (last edit: 8/7/2009 1:52:24 AM)
 
First page  Go to the previous page   [01]  [02]  Go to the next page  Last page
 
#Maxforums IRC
Open chat window


Support Maxforums.org