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Modelling a very exaggerated mouth?
show user profile  Dejitarujin
I need to create a particular effect with this character's face, and I've seen it dozens of times. In a lot of particularly cartoony CG films, it's not uncommon for a character's mouth to be exaggerated - often times, to the point that it will fluidly traverse from one side of the character's face to the opposite, and also change from a tiny "o" to a massive ear-to-ear grin. The effect I need isn't quite as extreme, but it is pretty close.

My question is, how do they do this? I mean, a normal mouth needs to do a lot, but it's more subtle, and doesn't move a great distance, so there's a certain typical way to model it. In order to move around a large chunk of a mesh like that, it seems you'd need to have a lot of vertices dedicated to nothing but keeping the area smooth and round while the mouth is elsewhere (and of course at the other side, such vertices are being crammed together tightly). I have to assume that morph targets would be the best way to animate such a thing, but how exactly do you create the mesh to work with? Are there any examples or tutorials?
~~~
Specialty: Non-organic modelling and effects.
Setup: 3D Studio 2010 with finalRender.
Rig: No, no I can't.
read 540 times
8/13/2009 2:36:29 AM (last edit: 8/13/2009 2:36:29 AM)
show user profile  Setherial
edgeloops
read 521 times
8/13/2009 4:18:18 AM (last edit: 8/13/2009 4:18:18 AM)
show user profile  Dave
"I have to assume that morph targets would be the best way to animate such a thing, but how exactly do you create the mesh to work with? Are there any examples or tutorials?"

You'd be bang on the money with that thought process. As for the mesh itself, you need only learn the principles of head/face modelling, from there on you can apply it to variously different scenarios.

Mad-Dog-Bomber's head modelling tutorials should suffice:
http://www.maxforums.org/grotey/membertuts.html


"I flew over Egypt once"

read 516 times
8/13/2009 4:23:38 AM (last edit: 8/13/2009 4:23:38 AM)
show user profile  Setherial
or...you could google "edgeloops" and read until you get it
read 511 times
8/13/2009 4:42:21 AM (last edit: 8/13/2009 4:42:21 AM)
show user profile  Dejitarujin
It doesn't seem like the traditional way to model a face would work very well for that. I mean, it would work, but it seems like, in order for there to be enough vertices to cover one extreme of movement, there would have to be way, way too many vertices involved in the other extreme. Is this just considered something we have to accept in such a situation?
~~~
Specialty: Non-organic modelling and effects.
Setup: 3D Studio 2010 with finalRender.
Rig: No, no I can't.
read 490 times
8/13/2009 7:32:32 AM (last edit: 8/13/2009 7:32:32 AM)
show user profile  K-tonne
if it's low poly enough shoudn't be a problem as a couple of iterations of smoothing would take care of jagged edges- be easier to rig if it's lower too
if it does appear to be a problem or it's too extreme and grimace maybe consider doing specific heads to do specific things and swapping them out as the time arises- the transition could be tricky though

Website and Portfolio

read 484 times
8/13/2009 7:41:06 AM (last edit: 8/13/2009 7:41:06 AM)
show user profile  Setherial
I don't see the problem, if your loops alow the motion and direction they were designed to handle then you can virtually stretch the hell out of them and they will still look good. It's like K-tonne said, a few added levels of iterration will smooth things out during rendering.

Just show us what you have and what gives you problems.
read 474 times
8/13/2009 8:24:21 AM (last edit: 8/13/2009 8:24:50 AM)
show user profile  jStins
I remember seeing an article awhile back written by an organic modeler. He/she modeled the head in the most extreme pose/blend shape (yes, using edgeloops).

Then the modeler deformed the final mesh into the neutral blend pose. Their reasoning was that by modeling in the most extreme pose and working backwards they would be certain there was enough geometry in the base to create any blend shape they needed, create wrinkles, etc...

Anyway, not necessarily my method, but something to consider.

[edit] Just reread the first post and realized you're going for cartoony, so I should mention the article I'm thinking of was based on realistic creatures/characters.

-Joel


joelstinson.com

read 444 times
8/13/2009 6:03:25 PM (last edit: 8/13/2009 6:07:58 PM)
show user profile  Dejitarujin
Aha! I didn't even consider modelling it in anything but a neutral state. That could indeed be very useful.

As for edgeloops... I really wasn't aware there was anything else. Kinda goes without saying.
~~~
Specialty: Non-organic modelling and effects.
Setup: 3D Studio 2010 with finalRender.
Rig: No, no I can't.
read 433 times
8/13/2009 8:30:18 PM (last edit: 8/13/2009 8:30:18 PM)
show user profile  donvella
theres some excellent tutorials on deformation for animation @

www.poopinmymouth.com

as odd as the webpage sounds, its a terrific resource



read 412 times
8/13/2009 11:11:19 PM (last edit: 8/14/2009 1:50:30 AM)
show user profile  Setherial
Maybe not entirely the same topic but since wrinkels where mentioned I can imagine running into problems. What if you made your morph targets in zbrush. Is it possible to morph between displacement maps as well ?
read 403 times
8/14/2009 1:51:59 AM (last edit: 8/14/2009 1:51:59 AM)
show user profile  jStins
I think it's possible to wire the intensity of a displacement to a morph. You could have the disp map increase as the value of a specific morph increases.

-Joel


joelstinson.com

read 371 times
8/14/2009 2:04:46 PM (last edit: 8/14/2009 2:04:46 PM)
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