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How do you tailor your cv?
show user profile  Alex910
Hello,

I am looking to find a job and willing to write a new cv from 0. I have a question since companies tend to be reticent on hiring you, when they find you to be over-skilled, because they think you can leave your job anytime. My question is... should I write down all the softwares that I know?

Also, planning to write down the skills I have with 2d/3d.

What do you think and what tips can you give me? Your answer is much appreciated.

Thank you!
read 356 times
3/8/2016 9:25:14 PM (last edit: 3/8/2016 9:25:14 PM)
show user profile  9krausec
If you need to downplay your abilities to get into a job then you are applying for the wrong job I'd say.

Show an awesome portfolio/demo reel and put the software down that you are familiar with. I always add Microsoft Word at the end of my list because I think it shows I have a sense of humor.

Edit: I haven't been bouncing around jobs though. I've held this position for almost 2 years now so I may not be the best person to give advice on how to present yourself to a company.




- Portfolio-




read 356 times
3/8/2016 9:31:34 PM (last edit: 3/8/2016 9:32:26 PM)
show user profile  Dave
"If you need to downplay your abilities to get into a job then you are applying for the wrong job I'd say."

Unfortunately for some this is just whatever they have to do to get some dolla-dolla coming in. Not to speculate too much here and drive this off-topic, but I've been a lead for 2+ years now, and if I was made redundant and all my money was running out, I would absolutely gun for a junior role, and just work my way back up. It would suck, but it beats being homeless.

That said, Alex... what sort of job are you going for? Games? Film? Marketing/Advertising?

"I flew over Egypt once"

read 342 times
3/8/2016 10:11:18 PM (last edit: 3/8/2016 10:11:18 PM)
show user profile  9krausec
^Very true Dave.




- Portfolio-




read 338 times
3/8/2016 10:28:39 PM (last edit: 3/8/2016 10:28:39 PM)
show user profile  donvella
IMO - I would write down the software you need for the job and anything that could compliment their set of skills - take a look at their website and see what things they could use to lift their game - do they need variation in materials, tree types, find something specific that would make u appear more interesting for them to hire.

More importantly, list your skills you can bring to the team that's not software related. By having secondary interests and skills that you do in your own time is complimentary (photography, life drawing, design, music, etc).

Last but not least, if your going to use a template (which is what I would start from) - make it appear different. Dont use default fonts, make an effort for it to appear different, dont use a 1990 style this is my hobbies etc, think a little more contemporary, keep it simple. How to contact you, some of the most recent impressive things you worked on, a couple references. If you are going with a cover letter, make it short and specific - how you intend on making their lives easier (not what you enjoy doing on your weekend).




read 331 times
3/8/2016 11:16:15 PM (last edit: 3/8/2016 11:16:57 PM)
show user profile  Bolteon
"Unfortunately for some this is just whatever they have to do to get some dolla-dolla coming in. Not to speculate too much here and drive this off-topic, but I've been a lead for 2+ years now, and if I was made redundant and all my money was running out, I would absolutely gun for a junior role, and just work my way back up. It would suck, but it beats being homeless."


Any company that sees a more-senior level artist/contractor/person/midget and doesn't hire them for a cheaper rate is *not* the type of place you want to work for.


That being said, no one ever really goes homeless. But if you're too scared of dealing with very little (or can't because of other commitments) then by all means, accept the lower rates.

-Marko Mandaric



read 327 times
3/8/2016 11:50:02 PM (last edit: 3/8/2016 11:50:02 PM)
show user profile  herfst1
You can also try making a deal with them. Be 100% upfront, say you need this job BUT will only take it if there's opportunity to progress in the company to a more senior position. They'll obviously agree, as it's the standard interview play, but then insist that if you meet all your targets you will be asking for a promotion in 3 months.

I've done this with the last couple of interviews I've had. 100% success so far.
read 305 times
3/9/2016 5:50:04 AM (last edit: 3/9/2016 5:50:04 AM)
show user profile  STRAT
what country/job sector are you after?

are you after a blanket CV to cover a ton of job applications , or are you wanting to specifically tailor your efforts into specific companies you have in mind?

I'd search out the jobs i was after, research them all i can, then heavily tailor my CV and portfolio and approach to that individual company to suit.





SJLEWORTHY.COM











read 291 times
3/9/2016 10:20:39 AM (last edit: 3/9/2016 10:43:31 AM)
show user profile  Octopuzzy
-"I am looking to find a job and willing to write a new cv from 0."
Willing? What other options do you have?

-"I have a question since companies tend to be reticent on hiring you, when they find you to
-be over-skilled, because they think you can leave your job anytime."
I don't think this is a thing. But don't worry about it..If the link in your profile is anything to judge your work by you are not "over-skilled" anywhere.

"My question is... should I write down all the softwares that I know? "
Not all but write down software that are commonly used in production and the ones that makes a big difference in your work that you could show the benefits of to your future employer.

"Also, planning to write down the skills I have with 2d/3d."
Don't micromanage it too much..can you draw to a professional level? That's pretty much a yes/no.
In 3d you can specialize a bit more so you might want to break down what you have a lot of experience with and what you are just familiar with.




read 283 times
3/9/2016 10:59:22 AM (last edit: 3/9/2016 10:59:22 AM)
show user profile  Alex910
Thanks for all the answers and tips. The old cv looks a bit complex and hard to read, what I noticed, so I did one tailored to (I'm looking for) Design, 3D, very simple and very comprehensive. I looked at the jobs requirements and improved it according to it. I'm very happy with the new cv now.


read 265 times
3/9/2016 11:05:23 PM (last edit: 3/9/2016 11:05:23 PM)
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