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Breathtaking modelling skills (sped up, but watchable)
show user profile  mike_renouf
I feel like leaping out the nearest window. Damn I wish I was this good:




read 654 times
11/26/2015 2:23:05 PM (last edit: 11/26/2015 2:23:05 PM)
show user profile  herfst1
I admit, I only got 1:39 in before stopping the video, so maybe there's something good later on... maybe it's just me but I was not impressed; particularly with the "epic" music choice.
read 623 times
11/26/2015 7:01:11 PM (last edit: 11/26/2015 7:01:11 PM)
show user profile  Dave
The thing that usually impresses me the most about modelling these days are the elegant solutions to things you didn't even know were problems. People like Garp seem to have this ability, where I might brute force the polygons into bending to my will, he'll simply whip out a flute and make them dance.

I'm not seeing anything breathtaking in the video there though Mike, and I'm sure you could get that good in a short amount of time. I'm not saying it's poor work by any means, but I guess the key here is to ask yourself "How would I make X" and if you see someone doing it better than what you had in mind, then just adopt it!

I think it probably helps to know the tool back-to-front, like I've been using 3d coat for a long while now but I've found myself sticking with the same functions to get my results, and so when I see some random speed modelling from someone else who's ventured further and really tinkered with its capabilities, I am left feeling a bit like "Wow, that's impressive, and I couldn't currently emulate it"... BUT, I know that if I just poked outside of my little safety bubble and tried it, it would not take long to match.

I think that's probably what you should do, don't feel like your own skill is lessened because someone out there is better, just learn to do what they're doing instead.

"I flew over Egypt once"

read 611 times
11/27/2015 12:14:49 AM (last edit: 11/27/2015 12:14:49 AM)
show user profile  Bolteon
He uses the symmetry tool with such finesse though... /s


This would have been impressive if he had coded all the tools that are required to manipulate the models. But... you know, Autodesk did that.

Side note, what the fuck does "Innovation architecture solution painted with Arabic Hands" mean???

-Marko Mandaric



read 600 times
11/27/2015 3:33:54 AM (last edit: 11/27/2015 3:33:54 AM)
show user profile  mike_renouf
I guess I overstated this video's impressiveness, due to my own very basic poly modelling skills. I find the whole subdiv modelling process to be pretty confusing despite having tried for some time to get better at it. Some of it looks like black magic when I see a cut here, a bevel, a few welds and suddenly the smoothed version looks dramatic and intricate.

"I know that if I just poked outside of my little safety bubble and tried it, it would not take long to match"

Maybe you're right Dave. I guess I should just push myself - that way by solving problems I'll probably pick up a bunch more skills.



"Side note, what the fuck does "Innovation architecture solution painted with Arabic Hands" mean??? ""

Damned if I know?!




read 578 times
11/27/2015 12:06:08 PM (last edit: 11/27/2015 12:06:08 PM)
show user profile  mike_renouf
Thinking about it further, this is a good opportunity -

What would YOU classify as amazing modelling skills? Can you post some examples so I can get another benchmark?




read 572 times
11/27/2015 12:14:39 PM (last edit: 11/27/2015 12:14:39 PM)
show user profile  Pil
Amazing skills of any kind and in any field is "the ability to solve problems".

To be a good modeler you need to be able to solve problems.
So dont work on you modeling skills but on your problem solving skills :-)


read 566 times
11/27/2015 12:30:01 PM (last edit: 11/27/2015 12:30:01 PM)
show user profile  Dave
Yeah, Pil has worded it better than I did with my Garp playing the flute example. But I would like to re-emphasise one bit:

"The thing that usually impresses me the most about modelling these days are the elegant solutions to things you didn't even know were problems."

This isn't restricted to modelling alone of course.

Here's Garp modelling a baseball:
http://www.screencast.com/t/lXgpj4qKh1z

This is sort of what I mean. Like, I could model a baseball, but there's no way I'd of thought to do it like that, and it gets you thinking about how he reached that point and decided on that method.

Edit
Oh! Forgot to mention, like... the baseball tutorial from Garp there, it's not really a tutorial on how to model a baseball. It's a tutorial on a method of modelling, using the baseball as practical example. I think A LOT of problems with learning 3d on places like youtube n'what not (could a generational thing) is they'll watch some guy model say... a hand, and then demand a tutorial for modelling a foot, and it's like "if you underdstood how to model the hand, you can fucking well' go and model the foot you bastards"

"I flew over Egypt once"

read 551 times
11/27/2015 3:39:27 PM (last edit: 11/27/2015 3:46:58 PM)
show user profile  herfst1
Still, for me, this was the best watch. Unfortunately I only watched it after I knew most of the tricks shown, could have saved at least a year of learning.

https://vimeo.com/10941211.

And, as those who know what's what have already said, "For everything else, just check out Garps' vids."

For me the most mind-blowing Garp vid was the chamfer the verts, then weld them to make diagonal lines on a plane. Such a simple trick, so useful.
read 532 times
11/27/2015 9:53:11 PM (last edit: 11/27/2015 9:53:11 PM)
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